Featured Articles

  1. Ashley Valley Water & Sewer Improvement District Relies On FPI Mag Flow Meter To Comply With Allocation Quota
    10/30/2014

    Ashley Valley Water & Sewer Improvement District (AVWSID) serves rural county residents who live outside the city of Vernal, Utah.

  2. DM Petroleum Operations Relies On FPI Mag Flow Meter For Tough U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve Application
    10/15/2014

    New tests recently performed by DM Petroleum Operations Company with the FPI Mag® Flow Meter from McCrometer continue to confirm the flow meter’s accurate performance and reliability on two rugged Texas brine disposal lines supporting the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR).

  3. Next Generation FPI Mag Flow Meter Helps Provide Clean Water For Seattle
    10/15/2014

    The Cedar Water Treatment Facility (CWTF) serves the residents of the City of Seattle. This state-of-the-art plant was designed and built, and is now operated by CH2M Hill.  Working together, CH2M Hill and McCrometer improved flow measurement at the facility with the FPI Mag® Flow Meter.

  4. 10 Things You Probably Don’t Know About Cone Meters (But Really Should Find Out)
    8/25/2014

    Cone meters have been around for decades, since the mid-1980s. They are frequently confused with other technologies for a number of reasons.

  5. McCrometer’s Calibration Laboratory Accredited To ISO 17025 Through NVLAP, A Signatory To ILAC
    6/17/2014

    McCrometer, a global leader in flow measurement, announces accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025:2005 through NVLAP (NVLAP is a division of NIST), an official signatory to (ILAC) International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation.

  6. The Benefits Of Cone-Type Flow Meters
    5/6/2014

    Selecting the proper flow meter will take an operator through a fairly typical vetting process, including consideration of capital expenditure (CAPEX), O&M requirements, effectiveness, and durability. Manufacturers of all meter types (e.g., Venturi meters, magnetic flow meters (magmeters), cone meters, etc.) will surely claim to excel in these categories, but can they back up the claim?

  7. Next Generation Mag Meter Measuring Flow In A Pump Station
    9/30/2013

    A municipal drinking water distribution system, also known as a water supply system, is used to provide fresh drinking water to residential and commercial customers and facilities around the world. A distribution system for drinking water typically begins with: a) intake of raw surface water from a reservoir or lake or b) ground water intake from wells transferred to a water treatment plant. During the water treatment process, the water intake must flow through a series of processes that clarify, filter, and disinfect the water source transported to the distribution system and made available for storage and human consumption. By Michelle Pawlowicz, marketing specialist, McCrometer

  8. Next Generation Mag Meter: A Tool For Leak Detection
    9/26/2013

    Water — our most precious resource — is depleted globally by multiple activities. Common uses include drinking water, fire protection, agricultural/irrigation, manufacturing, food processing, etc. As our global population continues to increase, so does the need for fresh water supply. As a dynamic resource with many universal commitments, it is not surprising, with so many different global variables, that water scarcity is becoming a concern for both developed and developing countries. By Michelle Pawlowicz, marketing specialist, McCrometer

  9. The Perfect Retrofit: Power Plant Upgrades Cooling Water System With FPI Mag Flow Meter
    7/15/2013

    A large power generation plant on a coastal bay site in the United States needed to convert its cooling tower water system to a closed-loop design. The newly retrofitted closed-loop system is more efficient and reduces the thermal impact on the bay. 

  10. Measuring Flow In A Pump Station
    3/1/2016

    A municipal drinking water distribution system, also known as a water supply system, is used to provide fresh drinking water to residential and commercial customers and facilities around the world. A distribution system for drinking water typically begins with: a) intake of raw surface water from a reservoir or lake or b) ground water intake from wells transferred to a water treatment plant. By Barry Spiegel, Director of Municipal Sales